3D Printing Management | 3DPrinterOS

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How to set up Octoprint easily with 3DPrinterOS.

August 18, 2021

How to set up Octoprint easily with 3DPrinterOS.

3D printing is becoming more accessible to the general public, and its use will be further facilitated as OctoPrint and 3DPrinterOS have announced that they will be partnering up.

Customers now can easily log into 3DPrinterOS.com and the Octoprint Plug is easy to install and connect your 3D printer online, for remote control and easier access.  

This is exciting news as more homes and companies are using 3D printers for different purposes, and this integration brings with it the expectation of a more streamlined use.

What is a 3D Printer?

A 3D Printer creates three-dimensional objects from different materials like powder or plastic by using computer-aided design (CAD). These printers are very flexible and can print a variety of different things. The printing works in layers where they are piled up on top of each other, bottom to top, until the finished object is complete.

What is Octoprint?

OctoPrint is a Web interface for printers. This application is used to control your 3D printer remotely.

This open-source solution first launched in 2012, with the more stable version that came out early this year. It is a globally popular product available for Windows, Linux, and macOS, and it is all being developed by a lone German software engineer – Gina Häußge.

What is 3DPrinterOS?

3DPrinterOS is an operating system for 3D printers, and it offers complete software packages such as Firmware, Cloud Platforms, etc. It covers all the aspects of 3D printing, as well as advanced manufacturing workflows.

3DPrinterOS has made its mission to ease 3D printer management, and this partnership is aimed to help ease integration processes.

What are the uses of a 3D printer?

A 3D printer can be used in many different industries for multiple purposes. Some of which are:

Medicine and Healthcare

3D printing is used in a few particular fields of medicine – namely bioprinting and prosthetics.

Bioprinting is where cells and growth factors are joined together to make structures similar to tissue where they can mimic their natural counterparts.

Prosthetics made via 3D printing are modifiable to a patient’s particular measurements and requirements, which are a cheaper alternative to normal prosthetics.

These are especially useful in children, as their size is constantly changing, so it would be expensive to purchase new prosthetics as soon as the old one is outgrown, but this is not an issue with 3D printable prosthetics as these can be changed multiple times a year at much lower cost points.

Education

3D printing allows students to easily create inexpensive prototypes without the need for advanced and heavy-duty tools. It gives the students a way to turn ideas from a page to a physical item that they can see and hold, and it brings their creativity to life.

Quicker Production

3D printed objects can get completed within a few hours, depending on the particular size, design, and complexity. This is still considered faster than traditional methods, which could easily take more hours, or even days to complete.

The designing process of the objects can also be quicker as creating CAD or STL files is relatively quick, and when these files are created, they are ready to be printed.

Construction

3D printing enables the construction industry to fabricate buildings and components inexpensively. The construction rate can be faster, the labor costs are significantly lower, the level of waste produced is also lower, and the construction is more accurate and complex.

Jewellery

Jewellery makers can experiment with different designs and try out more innovative and creative styles that would be difficult and waste resources in the normal jewellery-making methods. The jewellery can also be customized to the customers’ preferences and uniquely catered to their demands at cheaper costs when using certain 3D printing materials.

What will this integration bring?

By 3DPrinterOS teaming up with OctoPrint to become its corporate sponsor, it will open up a new avenue for the future of 3D printing. This promising integration will only benefit the 3D printing market and further normalize its personal and commercial use.

The problem with these integrations

The main issue with these integrations is that it is expensive and difficult to integrate 3D printers and build software.

You need to have a great level of experience and expertise, as well as a hefty chunk of change – easily in the millions. The programmer-level skill required is not easy to come by. This is where many companies seem to lack such resources, as in-house programming teams are needed to integrate OctoPrint fully.

Due to the companies falling short on these requirements, integrations have not been as successful in the past.

OctoPrint and 3DPrinterOS

3DPrinterOS brings with it its new 3D Printer Software Development Kit, where they aim to provide solutions to companies that have machines. This is not only catered to those working up to a new installation type. It also works for something new being offered to the market.

Whatever the case may be, 3DPrinterOS wants to facilitate these companies and help them get their products or services to the market.

3DPrinterOS strives to provide cost-friendly and less time-consuming 3D printing software solutions for you and your company’s FFF 3D printers.

When working with high-end customers such as FFF 3D printer manufacturers, users, makers, etc., 3DPrinterOS tries to find the best and easiest solutions for 3D printing integration. They offer this as a software service, where you get everything in a single place instead of needing to hire an entire team.

The 3DPrinterOS SDK comes in two versions – free and paid. The free version is packed with features, but the paid version is for the premium consumers that desire access to more advanced features.

To begin your integration, speak to one of our 3DPrinterOS experts, such as our CTO and Co-Founder Anton Vedeshin, to find timely and affordable solutions with guaranteed effectiveness.

Due to our financial sponsorship of OctoPrint, 3D printers sold with our license are a way to bring financial support to a community.

About 3D Control Systems

We are 3DPrinterOS’s parent company, known for pioneering the computer 3D printing market with their OS platform that brought forth “one-click” manufacturing.

3D Control Systems brings you an automated workflow platform meant for advanced manufacturing to increase efficiency and provide more simple solutions.

Check us out now at:

www.3dcontrolsystems.com

Bockman’s Bites on Lean Six Sigma in Additive Manufacturing Part 3

August 12, 2021

Bite III : Solutions

Welcome back to Bockman’s Bites … now, on to the last one…

The bedrock principle of Lean Six Sigma is to reduce waste by evaluating DOWNTIME or Defects, Overproduction, Waiting, Non-Utilized Talent, Transportation, Inventory, Motion, and Extra Processing. If you’re familiar with additive manufacturing then you know that these same principles can be applied more often than we care to admit. However, there are solutions that will lead to process improvements. 

It’s important to remember the DMAIC model in Six Sigma and that’s where I start when approaching a customer who already has components of a workflow.  Understanding the outcomes expected, but first baselining and process mapping the entire workflow looking for those gaps is first and foremost.

The next generation of industrialization is committed to an agile manufacturing approach. Defined by the ability to quickly respond to customer production needs, agile manufacturing embraces AM and integrates sophisticated software tools to enhance productivity. If we combine that with the Lean Six Sigma concept, then we can begin addressing immediate concerns with AM and solve problems like supply chain resiliency. 

Production Planning | Having access to a centralized Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software solution capable of organizing AM technologies and material capabilities across multiple facilities enables production specialists to quickly print parts and immediately service customer needs. Oftentimes referred to as on demand manufacturing, this process eliminates the need for warehousing and will completely transform  the traditional supply chain that constantly faces logistical nightmares (tariffs, long lead times, emissions). This creates a significant opportunity for repair and spare part providers to locally produce parts for aviation, transportation and defense products that cannot afford equipment downtime. 

Maximize Throughput | Data is key to improving workflows. Management Execution Systems (MES) are designed to connect, track and monitor complex systems to ensure operational efficiency and improve production output. Having an integrated software that seamlessly connects conventional manufacturing with AM enables engineering teams to quickly assess technology benefits and assign production requests using time, quality and cost metrics. With the right software, engineers can identify AM ready parts, develop cost assessments and provide complete production transparency to management. It’s a strategic communication tool that relies on data and connectivity. 

Conclusion

Maximizing the benefits of Lean Six Sigma takes an entire organization into consideration, encompassing hardware, software, processes and people. Is one more important than another when it comes to overall productivity? Not necessarily, but I argue that a sophisticated software solution cannot be underestimated and can likely become the backbone to process improvement. Reducing waste, eliminating downtime and enhancing throughput all relies on accurate data and production transparency. Ask yourself, how are you reducing waste in your process? What type of data do you use to justify decisions?  

At 3D Control Systems, we are tackling this head on and invite you to learn more about our software solutions that are addressing the problems of today and proactively preparing for ones of tomorrow.  

The best workflow software for Fab-Labs and Makerspaces

July 21, 2021

Duke University is home to one of the largest 3D printing networks in US academia. Over 120 3D printers are accessible by an entire student body enabling the prototyping and production of countless ideas and inventions. Applications vary with interest but it ranges from anywhere between entrepreneurial engineering to architectural modeling and beyond. Duke’s Fab-Lab has found a way to democratize 3D printing by adopting cutting edge hardware technologies and combining it with sophisticated workflow software solutions that make 3D printing simple and approachable for all academic disciplines in their campus.  We sat down with Chip Bobbert, CoLab Architect and Senior Technologist, to learn more on how they are managing their 3D printing network maker spaces.

 

Bobbert, former Command Center Specialist for the US Marine Corps, began working at Duke University in 2013 after spending two decades as a media technology engineer. His experience in conventional machining, media technology, 3D printing and education drives his ability to manage and improve the Duke CoLab.

What is so special about the Duke 3D printing network?  “Duke is a geographically large campus, approximately 3,500 developed acres. We have three maker spaces, consisting of approximately 80 printers, while our sister labs are assigned to specific programs located in multiple locations. With over 120 total printers on campus, we have found a way to simplify 3D printing and enable access to over 2,500 students year-over-year. Our maker spaces are predominantly filled with a range of Ultimaker 3D printers and our collective network is powered by 3D Control Systems’, 3DPrinterOS software solution. These complementary technologies enable Duke students from any discipline to access the printer network and build parts.”

What are the challenges with having such a vast printer network?  “First, we needed to determine how the program itself would work — would students pay for parts? What does scheduling look like? How would we manage it?  Having printers located throughout campus is great but we quickly realized that a middleware management software system would allow us to delegate rights to users and manage the flow of files from a centralized platform. We were shocked to find that not many software options like this existed, considering that there are countless 3D printers on the market, we thought this was rare. 

Of course, the platform needs to function properly but we require an identity management capability that allows us to authenticate users from anywhere and be monitored from one location.” 

How did Duke solve this challenge and what does access look like today?  “After searching for a software platform and even creating our own, we decided to try 3DPrinterOS. The printer management functionality is good but the real benefit is user management. There are thousands of unique users every year so we need software that would integrate into our system and accommodate that type of turnover. Let’s face it, designing for 3D printing can be complex but the printers themselves are typically low IQ systems that require a boost for ultimate connectivity and user optimization. 3DPrinterOS helps us accomplish that and now, we are expanding access to 3D printing way beyond the engineering department. Inventioning is possible for designers, architects, sculptures, artists and more.”

What is the future of 3D printing at Duke? “Convenience is key. How can we make 3D printing as simple and easy as 2D printing? The software platform is a powerful tool that democratizes access to the 3D printer network but we need to get closer to printing something with a single click of a button. Nobody cares about the printer, they care about their designs and parts. As a 3D printer evangelist, I understand this and believe that if we continue to simplify the process then it will become much more convenient and accessible. 3D printing has the ability to unlock so many new opportunities for bespoke manufacturing, medical applications, and beyond. I want non-engineers, scientists, doctors, and anyone else to have the ability to get parts in hand.” 

Learn more about Duke University, Ultimaker, and 3D Control Systems’ 3DPrinterOS platform for managing makerspaces. 

The Best 3D Printing Software On One Platform – 3DPrinterOS

May 18, 2018

The Best 3d Printing Software On One Platform – The vision of John Dogru, the CEO of 3DPrinterOS. Microsoft interview with John Dogru.

You can listen HERE or on iTunes

The vision is simple, one 3d printing platform that brings all the fragmented and disparate software together, allowing users to easily print to many different manufacturers, from one easy-to-use 3d printing software interface.

From the time he was a child, John Dogru had always shown interest in technology, often accompanying his parents to their Computer Science lectures at age five.  An entrepreneur since he was studying Electrical Engineering at the University of Texas, he was fascinated with the idea that 3D printing could one day transform traditional manufacturing and be available to masses.

“I quickly realized (as a child) this mechanical world had a lot of restrictions,” he tells host Jim Brisimitzis in the latest edition of Series A-The Podcast.

Dogru offers valuable insights into founding a business in a still budding field, where technology is just beginning to catch up to the overall vision. He compares it to when IBM DOS first came on the scene. “You need a platform that’s agnostic to whatever printer manufacturer and design tools they’re using,” he says.

3DPrinterOS aims to do just that. 

Show Notes:

 

 

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